Jill A. Perry - Publications
Faculty - Executive Director of CPED

Journals

Leland, A., Firestone, W., Perry, J.A., & McKeon, R. (2020). Examining cohort models in the education doctorate. Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education. DOI (10.1108/SGPE-01-2020-0004)
This article presents a thematic analysis on cohort-based teaching and learning from four, education doctorate degree (EdD) programs. Recommendations are then presented to other scholars engaging in research on cohort-based, graduate degree programs.
Yin’s (2018) embedded, multiple case study approach guided the design of this study. Data collection consisted of three- to four-day site visits to each program and included the following data sources: program documents (e.g., handbooks, syllabi, third-party evaluations), class observations, and semi-structured interviews with students, faculty, and program directors.
This study describes how collaboration and collective learning were key components in each program’s coursework and milestone expectations, arguing that such an emphasis contributed to opportunities for collaboration and collective learning experiences.
Research has documented a number of outcomes associated with cohort-based programs in terms of group dynamics. The authors examine this quality further by showing how specific structures and practices within each program’s cohort model not only supported peer collaboration, but overall student learning.
Perry, J.A., Zambo, D.& Abruzzo, E. (2020). Faculty Leaders Challenges and Strategies in Redesigning EdD Programs. Impacting Education: Journal for Transforming Professional Practice. 5(1) pp.1-6.
Producing change in higher education is not always easy or quick (Kennedy, et al., 2018; Perry, 2014a; Schuster & Finkelstein, 2006; Tierney, 1998). Conferences provide faculty with exposure to new ideas, but that exposure is often not enough to produce programmatic and structural change. In addition to new ideas, faculty must also have the tools they need to navigate change and institutional resistance when introducing and implementing new ideas. Over the last decade or so, school of education faculty, guided by the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) have worked to redesign the Education Doctorate and make it a professional practice degree. As a leader in educational change, CPED aims to reframe the EdD through both the cultivation of innovative ideas and the promulgation of those ideas across existing institutions and structures. CPED found faculty leaders to be necessary in creating institutional change, but also that the role of leader is a challenging one. Building upon earlier inquiries of faculty from CPED member institutions, this current study sought to discover more about the needs, challenges, and means for successful innovation implementation by EdD programmatic change leaders. More
Leland, A., Firestone, W., & Perry, J.A. (accepted). Examining cohort models in the education doctorate. Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education.

Purpose: This paper presents a thematic analysis on cohort-based teaching and learning from four, education doctorate degree (EdD) programs. Recommendations are then presented to other scholars engaging in research on cohort-based, graduate degree programs.

Design/Methodology/Approach: Yin’s (2018) embedded, multiple case study approach guided the design of this study. Data collection consisted of three- to four-day site visits to each program and included the following data sources: program documents (e.g., handbooks, syllabi, third-party evaluations), class observations, and semi-structured interviews with students, faculty, and program directors.

Findings: This study describes how collaboration and collective learning were key components in each program’s coursework and milestone expectations, arguing that such an emphasis contributed to opportunities for collaboration and collective learning experiences.

Originality/value: Research has documented a number of outcomes associated with cohort-based programs in terms of group dynamics. The authors examine this quality further by showing how specific structures and practices within each program’s cohort model not only supported peer collaboration, but overall student learning.

Keywords: cohorts; educational leadership; education doctorate; EdD programs, social practice theory; collaboration; community

Article Classification: Research paper

Firestone, W., Seashore, K., Leland, A., & Perry, J.A. (submitted). Learning to use evidence: The case of the education doctorate. Education Administration Quarterly.
Purpose: Educational leaders are key brokers of evidence within their institutions but are often poorly prepared for that work. This paper explores a prominent strategy for increasing their capacity to use evidence: academic preparation through doctoral study. Methods: We conducted a mixed methods study of four broadly distributed EdD programs with site visits to learn about their programs where we interviewed faculty and students. More important, we conducted one of the first follow-up studies of alumni including both surveys and interviews. Findings: Following past research we expected to find three uses of evidence: instrumental (using evidence to make decisions), conceptual (learning from evidence), and persuasive (using evidence to convince others). While we did, individual histories of use often combined all three where learning led to instrumental use with persuasion occurring repeatedly. Two program features influence alumni evidence use: 1) methods training that uses learning activities that link research to students’ everyday work and 2) the development of social capital through bonds among students and especially between students and faculty. Social bonding during the program builds the bridging capital that helps alumni find evidence after graduation. Implications: This study highlights the importance of both social capital and making research knowledge practical to promoting evidence use.
Firestone, W., Perry, J.A., & Leland, A. (submitted). Teaching research evidence use through the education doctorate. Educational Management Administration & Leadership

Purpose -- This paper explores how educational doctorate programs (EdDs) prepare graduates to use a variety of evidence types after they graduate.

Design/methodology/approach – A multiple case study design was used to understand what these programs taught and how and how they were viewed by their students. Data were collected through documents, interviews with faculty and students, and direct observation of learning situations.

Findings – These programs developed students’ capacity to assess research and conduct applied studies. Equally, they enhanced students’ ability to communicate about research effectively to relevant audiences. The strength of individual group programs is that they help graduates learn to design research that fits local needs. The strength of group dissertation programs is that they help graduates learn to communicate in ways that build teams and address conflict. Neither type emphasizes helping graduates learn to create a context for evidence use.

Research limitations/implications – Although we looked for better programs, we lacked program effectiveness data to guide our choices.

Practical implications – By illustrating what reputedly strong programs do, we offer suggestions for all programs. By pointing out gaps in what is offered, we suggest directions for future development.

Firestone, W., Perry, J.A., Leland, A. & McKeon, R. (2019). Teaching Research and Data Use in the Education Doctorate. Journal of Research on Leadership Education. https://doi.org/10.1177/1942775119872231
Schools now face a sea of “evidence”—supposedly validated products, research findings, and test, demographic, and teacher-generated data—that leaders must use. How have recent reforms to educational doctorate (EdD) programs addressed these demands? Case studies of four exemplary EdD programs illustrate how the better ones help graduates learn to use evidence. These programs have well-developed strategies for teaching students to find, assess, and conduct practical research. While they provide opportunities for students to share their work with users, they rarely provide the intellectual tools and frameworks to think about putting different kinds of evidence into practice, even in leadership courses. More
Perry, J.A. (2018). Adapted from the October 2017 Convening Opening Address: CPED Beyond 10 Years. Impacting Education: Journal on Transforming Professional Practice. (3).1
Perry, J.A. & Zambo, D. (in press) Themed Section of Impacting Education focused on CPED's Principles. Impacting Education: Journal for Transforming Professional Practice
Hafenstein, N.L., Perry, J.A., Hesbol, K.A., & Chou, S.H. (2017). Introduction: Perspectives in Gifted Education: Influences and Impacts of the Education Doctorate on Gifted Education. Perspectives in Gifted Education Vol. 6
Peterson, D., Perry, J.A., Dostilio, L. D., & Zambo, D. (2016). Community-engaged faculty: A must for preparing impactful EdD graduates. Metropolitan Universities Journal.
Perry, J.A. & Imig, D. (2016). What do we mean by impact? Impacting Education: Journal on Transforming Professional Practice. Vol. 1.
Peterson, D., Perry, J.A., Dostilio, L. D., & Zambo, D. (accepted). Community-engaged faculty: A must for preparing impactful EdD graduates. Metropolitan Universities Journal.
Perry, J.A. & Zambo, D. (accepted) The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate: A Partnership of Universities and Schools Working to Improve Higher Education, Education Doctorate, and K-20 Schools. In Blessinger, P. & Cozza, B. University Partnerships for Academic Program and Professional Development. IHETL Vol 7.
Perry, J.A., Zambo, D. & Wunder, S., Understanding How Schools of Education have Redesigned the Doctorate of Education (Accepted to Journal of School Public Relations for 2015).
Perry, J.A. (2014). Changing schools of education through grassroots faculty-led change. Innovation in Higher Education 39(2) pp. 155-168 DOI 10.1007/s10755-013-9267-y
Zambo, R., Zambo ,D., Buss, R. R., D., Perry, J. A., & Williams, T. R. (2014). Seven Years After the Call: Students' and Graduates' Perceptions of the Re-envisioned EdD Innovation in Higher Education 39(2). pp. 123-137. DOI 10.1007/s10755-013-9262-3
Perry, J.A. (2014). The CPED Claim: A counter response. UCEA Review 55(1), pp. 22-24.
Perry, J.A. (2013). Introduction Carnegie project on the education doctorate: The education doctorate - A degree for our time. Planning and Changing Journal. 44(3/4). pp. 113-126.
Perry, J.A. (Ed). (2013). The Education Doctorate, A Degree for Our Times. Special Issue. Planning and Changing Journal. 44(3/4).
Hochbien, C. & Perry, J.A. (2013) The Role of research in the professional doctorate. Planning and Changing Journal. 44(3/4). pp. 181-194.
Perry, J.A. (2012). To EdD or not to EdD? Phi Delta Kappan. 94(1). Pp. 41-44.
Perry, J.A. (2011). The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate: Phase II-a quest for change. UCEA Review 52(3). 1-3.

Books

Perry, J.A., Zambo, D. & Crow, R. (2020). The Improvement Science Dissertation in Practice: A guide faculty, committee members and their students. Maine: Myers Education Press.
The Improvement Science Dissertation in Practice provides a narrative and illustration about the purpose and features comprising the Dissertation in Practice and how this culminating experience is well suited to using Improvement Science as a signature methodology for preparing professional practitioners. This methodology, when combined with the Dissertation in Practice experience in EdD programs, reinforces practitioner learning about and skills for leadership and change. As a guide, the book is an extremely valuable resource that supports faculty, students, and practitioners in the application of Improvement Science to pressing educational problems in a structured, disciplined way More
Perry, J.A. (Ed.) (2016) The EdD and Scholarly Practitioners: the CPED Path. Charlotte, NC: IAP
Perry, J.A. (Ed.) (accepted) The EdD and Scholarly Practitioners: the CPED Way. Charlotte, NC: IAP
Perry, J.A. & Carlson, D.L. (Eds.). (2013). In Their Own Words: A Journey to the Stewardship of the Practice in Education. Charlotte: Information Age Publishing

Book Chapters

Perry, J.A. & Zambo, D. (2019). Using Improvement Science to Develop Scholarly Practitioners. In Crow, R., Hinnant-Crawford, B.N. & Spaulding, D.T. (in press). The Educational Leader's Guide to Improvement Science: Data, Design and Cases for Reflection. Maine: Myers Education Press
Perry, J.A. & Abruzzo, E. (in press). Preparing the scholarly practitioner: The importance of socialization in CPED-influenced EdD programs. In Weidman, J.C. & DeAngelo, L. (in press).Socialization in higher education and the early career: Theory, research and application. New York: Springer

This chapter seeks to apply the Weidman Model for socialization to the Education Doctorate, or EdD. In particular, this chapter will focus on the CPED-influenced EdD, programs that have been redesigned under the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate’s (CPED) Framework. EdD programs generally attract students who are already practicing professionals, therefore the aim of the program is slightly different than in other professional programs such as medicine, law, clergy, etc. This chapter will discuss how CPED has changed the EdD and what that has meant for socializing students in these programs by looking at two data efforts through the lens of the Weidman Model.

Perry, J.A. (2018). The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate: Transforming education practice in multiple contexts. In Mok, K.H., Neubauer, D., & Jiang, J. The Sustainability of Higher Education Massification: Cases from Asia Pacific and the U.S. New York: Routledge.
Hoffman, R. & Perry, J.A. (2016). The CPED Framework: Tools for Change. In Perry, J.A. (Ed.) The EdD and Scholarly Practitioners: the CPED Path. Charlotte, NC: IAP
Perry, J.A. (2016) The New Education Doctorate: Preparing the Transformational Leader. In Perry, J.A. (Ed.) The EdD and Scholarly Practitioners: the CPED Path. Charlotte, NC: IAP
Perry, J.A. (2016). The Scholar Practitioner as Steward of Practice. In Storey, V. & Hesbol K. (Eds). Contemporary Approaches to Dissertation Development and Research Methods. Hershey, PA: IGI Global
Perry, J.A. & Zambo, D. (2016) The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate: A Partnership of Universities and Schools Working to Improve Higher Education, Education Doctorate, and K-20 Schools. In Blessinger, P. & Cozza, B. University Partnerships for Academic Program and Professional Development. IHETL Vol 7.
Perry, J.A. (accepted) The Scholar Practitioner as Steward of Practice. In Storey, V. & Hesbol K. (Eds). Contemporary Approaches to Dissertation Development and Research Methods. Hershey, PA: IGI Global
Givens Generett, G., Henderson, J., & Perry, J.A. (2014). At the intersection of Black and White: Defining social justice from different perspectives. In Bogotch, I., & Shields, C. (2014) International Handbook on Social [In]justice & Educational Leadership. (pp. 1229-1246) Netherland: Springer Publishing.
Perry, J.A. (2013). Developing Stewards of Practice. In Perry, J.A. & Carlson, D.L. (Eds.). (2013). In Their Own Words: A Journey to the Stewardship of the Practice in Education. Charlotte: Information Age Publishing
Perry, J.A. & Hoffman, R. (2013). Epilogue. Redesigning Professional Education Doctorates: Applications of Critical Friendship Theory to the EdD New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
Perry, J.A. (2012). What does history reveal about the education doctorate? In Macintyre Latta, M. & Wunder, S. (Eds.). Placing Practitioner Knowledge at the Center of Teacher Education: Rethinking the Policy and Practice of the Education Doctorate. Charlotte: Information Age Publishing

Magazines

Perry, J.A. (2015) The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate - A Path for Change. Change Magazine.
Perry, J.A. (2015). The EdD and the Scholarly Practitioner. School Administrator Magazine.
Perry, J.A. & Imig, D. (2008). A steward of practice in education. Change Magazine, November/December.
Jill A. Perry

Contact

University of Pittsburgh
5525 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
230 South Bouquet Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
412-624-7272
jperry@pitt.edu