Maureen Porter - Presentations

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Maureen Porter

Maureen Porter

University of Pittsburgh
5709 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
230 South Bouquet Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
Phone: 412-648-7041
Email: mporter@pitt.edu

Presentations

  • Bersin, N., & Porter, M.K. (2016, April). "Deutsch ist, wer Deutsch spricht?!?" Identity and inclusion writ large as long-term trends in mobility in Germany. In M. Porter (Chair), Weaving safety nets across the global and the local: Resilient, proactive responses to migration and mobility. Symposium conducted at the meeting of the Council of Europeanists. Philadelphia, PA.
    SESSION ABSTRACT: Migration and mobility have long characterized Europe, whatever its shifting boundaries and definitions have been

    throughout the centuries. This panel knits together presentations from international politics, organizational

    development, education, social work, cultural and area studies in order to examine the fabric of the social safety net

    that is growing to connect schools, “third spaces,” social services, legal and human rights organizations. The ways that

    new migrants and long-time citizens are negotiating what it means to live together, to be European, and to be educated

    are all in flux. Both on local and global scales, humane responses are called for that are proactive, flexible, and

    resilient in the face of ever-increasing pressures to innovate and include. We look at networks starting at the local

    scale, examining, e.g. the consequences for minor refugees who bring both their traumas as well as their unique

    strengths and aspirations to school and to third spaces where they learn to thrive again. We ask what it means to

    belong, to learn the language of a new country, even to exercise human rights or to fully participate in the extended

    spaces for learning and belonging as citizens. Then we systematically extend our analysis to regional and then global

    scales to examine e.g. new modes of mapping porous European borders and thus visualizing gaps or overlapping

    agency services. The panel features the collective expertise from distinguished full professors, leaders of coordinated

    European-wide projects, mentors on multi-generational research teams, talented ethnographers, accomplished

    practitioners, and emerging undergraduate scholars.

  • Marshall, L. & Porter, M.K. (2015, November). Awakening to the arts and creating peace through large-scale intercultural projects that build infrastructure. In T. Nicewonger (Chair), Educational infrastructures: exploring socio-technological assemblages. Symposium conducted at the meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Denver, CO.
    Abstract: The Create Peace Project brings together artists and peace educators who partner with novice artmakers

    on large-scale, arts-based projects that require the contributions and creativity of

    international/intercultural teams. Conducted in both formal schools and in community-centered

    alternative spaces, the goals of this social justice project are to provide tangible demonstrations (e.g.

    mosaics, murals, installations, performances) of sustainable shifts in capacity and infrastructure for

    continued partnerships and arts exchanges. While the art pieces typically remain in the community (or

    are shared between community partners) as lasting evidence of the collaboration, we also are

    intentional about the sustainable value of the embedded pedagogies that unite and affirm the

    nascent community of practice. Using the framework of “courageous conversations,” we make

    explicit the ways that an intentional focus on teaching conflict negotiation, group consensus building,

    speaking across race/dialect lines is essential -- and transformative – for the youth and adult mentors

    who participate in this exchange. The hands-on, educative pedagogies require that participants move

    beyond preconceived stereotypes of the “Other,” and the subject matter of the projects helps to

    affirm their shared humanity, concern for the earth, and desire for restorative peace. At the collective

    level, the various initiatives under the Create Peace Project demonstrate the synergy that can be

    achieved – and sustained – at the host NGO as well as among the in-country experts; together they

    refine their craft, compose their own narratives, and incorporate novice members into a committed

    community of practicing artists and peace educators.

  • Hogsett, M. & Porter, M.K. (2015, November). Counter-narratives from the Negev: Culturally responsive education projects with Bedouin girls. In T. Nicewonger (Chair), Educational infrastructures: exploring socio-technological assemblages. Symposium conducted at the meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Denver, CO.
    Abstract: Possibilities abound for creating projects as a staging ground for addressing social, educational, and

    political challenges for minority communities around the world. This paper addresses

    intersectionalities in gender equality, peace studies, and indigenous education through a description

    of collaborative, native-centered approaches to experientially-based educational projects with female

    Bedouin students in the Negev Desert. In the multi-ethnic state of Israel, Bedouin girls face numerous

    challenges in being seen, heard, and respected as capable agents of their own education. As the

    lives of these traditionally nomadic students meet transitions to modernization and relocation,

    culturally responsive pedagogy and conflict-negotiation cultivate agency and regenerative spaces for

    transformative learning and social change. Innovative infrastructures offer the opportunity for the dual,

    dialogical, dynamic, and distinctive (Porter, 2015) culture of the Bedouin to be creatively expressed

    while honoring, reframing, and sharing the knowledge, folklore, and values of their ancestors and

    heritage. Descriptions and analysis of successful projects to foster cultural continuity, agency, and

    voice will highlight how the steps we take with communities in the margins should align with the

    distinctive geopolitical context and envisioned future for living out social justice in that unique place.

    Countering local gendered narratives of who they should be, where they should live, and how they

    should express themselves have all been nurtured by this infrastructure project. As we look to the

    sustainability of this regenerative poetic-political program, we share lessons from balancing and

    celebrating the roles of international NGOs, local educators at schools and at the university, and the

    girls themselves.

  • Porter, M.K., Cunningham, R., Ely, J., Smith, M.S., & Wooten, C. (2015, Oct.). M.K. Porter, Chair. Crafting meaningful international experiences for graduate and professional participants. Symposium conducted at the meeting of the Pennsylvania Council for International Education. PIttsburgh, PA.
  • Porter, M.K., (2016, April). Epiphanies in helix: A pseudo-Greek drama in three acts: On the paradoxes and dilemmas of revealing personal DNA information as modes of truth-telling. Performance-based scientific panel chaired at the Doing the Body in the 21st Century. Pittsburgh, PA.
  • Porter, M.K., & Robinson, R. (2015, Oct.). European student mobility: Understanding systems, trends, and culture. Presentation for the symposium and workshop, International Higher Education. Westmoreland County Community College. Youngwood, PA.
  • Porter, M.K. (2015, October). To engage in international service-learning. Original poem presented as part of the keynote session for Academically Based Civic Engagement. Pittsburgh, PA.
  • Porter, M.K., Dawkins, S., Hogsett, M. & Wagner, S. (2015, March). Assembling our story: Depictions of Peruvian youth. In M.K. Porter (Chair), Ethnographies with the global village on the move. Symposium conducted at the meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology, Pittsburgh, PA.

    Abstract: This session looks at the ways that applied anthropology students can engage in apprenticeship learning with multiple media, new social networking resources, arts-based engagement, and qualitative multi-media rich software to craft multi-layered, nuanced, multi-vocal, engaging accounts. Drawing from fieldwork with diverse nomadic, refugee, and immigrant communities, we (authors and discussant as a team) present an interactive conversation about enduring quandaries when using media-ted modes of documenting knowledge in the field, back at the studio, and for the public. We share insight into core foci of: representation, partnership, authorship, agency, power, voice, and the nature of story itself.

  • Porter, M.K., Cunningham, R., Smith, M.S., Wooten, C., & Ely, J. (2015, Oct.). M.K. Porter, Chair. Crafting meaningful international experiences for graduate and professional participants. Symposium conducted at the meeting of the Pennsylvania Council for International Education.PIttsburgh, PA.
  • Porter, M.K., Cunningham, R., Smith, M.S., Wooten, C., & Ely, J. (2015, Oct.). M.K. Porter, Chair. Crafting meaningful international experiences for graduate and professional participants. Symposium conducted at the meeting of the Pennsylvania Council for International Education.PIttsburgh, PA.
  • Porter, M.K., Cunningham, R., Ely, J., Smith, M.S., & Wooten, C. (2015, Oct.). M.K. Porter, Chair. Crafting meaningful international experiences for graduate and professional participants. Symposium conducted at the meeting of the Pennsylvania Council for International Education.PIttsburgh, PA.
  • Porter, M.K., Cunningham, R., Smith, M.S., Wooten, C., & Ely, J. (2015, Oct.). M.K. Porter, Chair. Crafting meaningful international experiences for graduate and professional participants. Symposium conducted at the meeting of the Pennsylvania Council for International Education.PIttsburgh, PA.
  • Porter, M.K., Cunningham, R., Smith, M.S., Wooten, C., & Ely, J. (2015, Oct.). M.K. Porter, Chair. Crafting meaningful international experiences for graduate and professional participants. Symposium conducted at the meeting of the Pennsylvania Council for International Education.PIttsburgh, PA.
  • Porter, M.K., Cunningham, R., Smith, M.S., Wooten, C., & Ely, J. (2015, Oct.). M.K. Porter, Chair. Crafting meaningful international experiences for graduate and professional participants. Symposium conducted at the meeting of the Pennsylvania Council for International Education.PIttsburgh, PA.
  • Porter, M.K. & Krekanova, V. (2015, February). Effective use of qualitative data analysis software in the early design phase of research. Paper presented at the Ethnographic and Qualitative Research Conference, Las Vegas, NV.

    Abstract: Researchers still face dismissive challenges from IRBs and funders when they state their intention to use software. We counter these naïve judgments with assertions about the value, even necessity, of using software capacities, particularly during the critical early design phases. Applying our conceptual framework built around the three convergent processes of situating, managing, and conceptualizing research, we offer practical arguments about great advantage of selective, strategic use of software during the highly creative and generative initial design cycles. So as to provide a coherent point of reference, we refer to NVivo as a tool that we have utilized and taught extensively in advanced research seminars. Practicing what we preach, we provide authentic, visual examples of these three tasks. This article will fill a consequential gap in the published literature and thus has implications for further legitimating qualitative research as a robust and systematic approach to generating meaningful, original knowledge.

  • Porter, M.K., & Robinson, R. (2015, Oct.). European student mobility: Understanding systems, trends, and culture. Presentation for the symposium and workshop, International Higher Education. Westmoreland County Community College. Youngwood, PA.
  • Porter, M.K. (2015, March). Progress or posturing? Examining the discourse and praxis of the MDGs. Paper presented at the 3rd Annual International and Interdisciplinary Conference: Progress or posturing? Examining the Progress of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals, Rohatyn Center for Global Affairs at Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT. Retrieved from http://www.middlebury.edu/international/rcga/international-conference/2015/presenter-bios/mporter

    Abstract: A gendered analysis is essential to achieving the eight MDGs; it is implicit in all and explicit as a goal in several. I will illustrate, both in the MDGs and in subsequent reports, the deep metaphors, definitions of human rights, assumptions about the family, and economic principles that are embodied in the discourse. These social constructions of the constitutive problems to be remedied have had far-reaching consequences for the solutions that are offered (and are politically viable). I will outline main tenets of the three most important paradigms that have shaped waves of reform aimed at achieving the MDGs: “women in development,” “gender and development,” and “gender mainstreaming.” These paradigms offer fundamentally different definitions of the underlying causes of disparity and hence they inform efforts to identify stakeholders, measure progress, and build public consensus about the importance of achieving specific MDGs. Focusing intentionally on the two goals of “achieving universal primary education” and “promoting equity and empowering women,” I show how embedded discourses about voice, agency, and culture have become both barriers and facilitators for sustainable, locally-owned change. I offer clear suggestions for decentering and de-colonializing discourses of development so that we can build cross- gender, global partnerships that honor the contributions and culturally-nuanced contexts of multiple stakeholders. In illustrating these principles, I draw on a decade of work in the Peruvian Andes with women, families, and community agencies. Together we have been trying to live out the principles of gender-explicit empowerment in the linked domains of the eight MDGs.

    More
  • Porter, M. K. (2011, April 18). Growing a sense of place: The edible schoolyard, playground habitats, and classrooms floating on the river. Panel entitled School Spaces. Organized by MIchaela Nietert, Regina Bendix, Margaret Kraul . Lisbon, Portugal: Inte

    Apr 18, 2011
  • Soska, T., & Porter, M. K. (2011, March 26). The impact of community engagement: Moving from output to outcomes. Panel on Engagement as Scholarship. SPRING Service-learning Network Symposium and Showcase.

    Mar 26, 2011
  • Porter, M. (2010). Laying a solid foundation for coming to know one another: The Pago de la Tierra groundbreaking ceremony. Panel entitled Bearing Traditions across School-Community Barriers. Organized by Linda Deafenbaugh. . Nashville, TN: American Folkl

    Nov 2010
  • Porter, M. (2010, October 6). The professora who played with fire: The Andean Pago de la Tierra as the spark for intercultural understanding. Interactive Dram Presentation and Multimedia Prezi Show . Institute for International Studies in Education (IISE)

    Oct 6, 2010
  • Research and Scholarship in Service-Learning

    Mar 24, 2010


    SPRING's Third Annual Service-Learning Symposium and Showcase Event. Pittsburgh, PA. Presented by Tracy Soska (School of Social Work, University of Pittsburgh) and Maureen K. Porter (School of Education, University of Pittsburgh)This was a featured workshop at the regional service-learning alliance. I covered current challenges in the academy and redefintions from the Boyer report that redefine scholarship. I provided workshop participants with criteria for evaluating scholarship as well as described my own modes of research and publication on the subject. I led a discussion of best practices and effective collaborations.


  • Aesthetic Elements of Ethnographic Research and Literacy

    Feb 20, 2010


    METHODOLOGY MATTERS: MOVING LITERACY RESEARCH FORWARD National Council of Teachers of English 2010 Assembly for Research Midwinter Conference (NCTEAR) Pittsburgh, PA The 2010 conference theme focuses on new research methodologies that have emerged in response to new questions in literacy research, such as the relationship between literacy and identity, longitudinal literacy development, and out-of-school literacies. The conference theme also aims to address current practical, theoretical, and methodological challenges in literacy research, such as collecting rich data within classrooms and managing tensions between ³scientifically-based² research and in-depth qualitative research. Our keynote speakers will speak to the affordances and challenges of various literacy research methodologies, including memoir,oral history, classroom discourse analysis, policy research and teacher/faculty collaborations

  • The Power to Create: Authority, Ambivalence and Fortitude

    Sep 15, 2009


    GENDER AND LEADERSHIP - TOWARDS NEW STRATEGIES OF LEADERSHIP AND POWER. 2nd International Women's leadership Conference. Claudia Fahrenwald (Universitaet Augsburg) and Maureen Porter (University of Pittsburgh). Gender Zentrum Augsburg Gender in Wissenschaft, Forschung & Management Universität Augsburg, Augsburg, Germany.


  • Best of Pennsylvania: Podcasting & Skype: New Ways to Globally Connect Your Classroom

    Apr 17, 2009
    Northeast Conference on the teaching of Foreign Languages (NECTFL). New York, NY. This was a technologically and chronologically updated version of our podcasting presentation and the poster table display that we presented at PSMLA. We were selected as one of the top THREE presentations of the over 200 presenters at the Northeast Conference on the teaching of Foreign Languages (NECTFL)!
  • Literacy Links: A Collaborative Peru-US Ecology Podcast Project

    Nov 20, 2008
    Council on Anthropology of Education. American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting. San Francisco, CA. This peer-reviewed poster depicted the stages and essential elements of the podcasting collaborative. I showcased effective elements of this university-community-school partnership.
  • Podcasting & Skype: New Ways to Globally Connect Your Classroom

    Oct 18, 2008


    Pennsylvania State Modern Language Association (PSMLA). Pittsburgh, PA. In this presentation, my co-author, Spanish teacher Holly Forsyth of Fox Chapel Schools, and my graduate student project assistant, Chad Dorn, created a multi-media demonstration of both Skype teleconferencing capacity as well as Garageband-based podcasting. We demonstrated this curriculum enhancement project through which we connected fourth graders in Peru and Pittsburgh. Both groups researched elements of global climate change that were impacting potato harvests and glacial melting. During the LINCS 2008 service-learning program we worked with local NGO ProPeru and Pintacha Elementary School kids to film, record, photograph, and create the Peruvian sections of the podcasts. Our presentation was rated the "Best of the Conference" and we were honored to be sponsored as the "Best of Pennsylvania" presentation at the next level's conference in New York.


  • Beyond Access to Equity & Excellence: Engaging Feminist Scholarship to Address Gender Gaps in Education Around the World

    Oct 11, 2008
    This presentation provided a brief overview of persistent gender gaps in educational participation, attainment, and leadership. Using lenses of diverse global feminisms to reframe the underlying problems, my student co-author, Muriel Zhou, and I offered frameworks to identify key actors and drivers for sustainable social change. We also talked about the importance of feminist scholarship that is engaged and interactive for generating promising spaces and strategies for actions. Our goal was to leave participants with a better appreciation of the real challenges still facing women and men around the world, as well as ways that we can work together to build local and international capacity for changing policies and improving the educational experiences of all learners.
  • Building School-University partnerships to Improve Educatinal Quality

    Apr 2006
    John Myers and I put together this summary of our joint work for FOER as well as our overall engaged scholarship for a CGSE panel entitled "Cooperative Learning - University Style: Working Collaboratively Across Programs, Departments and Schools"

    More information can be found at both http://org.elon.edu/nccc/slcf/2007/pre.html
    and http://org.elon.edu/nccc/slcf/2007/Porter%20cvita%20%20web%20links.pdf
  • The Importance of Cultivating a Sense of Place in School Policy and Practice

    Mar 1, 2006
    This keynote presetnation kicked off the conference "Sense of Place: Land and Cultural Identities around the World" that was sponsored by the University Center for International Studies, the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, and the Pennsylvania Ethnic Heritage Studies Center. From the program notes: " Dr. Porter will share her work on sense of place and its importance in K-12 school policy and practice. She will present major issues in teaching about and fostering school environments that enhance a sense of place from her work in Germany, Peru, Appalachia, and in Pitsburgh neighborhoods. Though sense of place is a core issue covered in the PA Geography Standards, this workshop's content and materials will be appropriate for teachers in many other subjects including social studies, language arts, ecology, culture and area studies at all grade levels." The five-hour workshop was offered for Act 48 credits for those completing follow-up curriculum designs and evauations.