Renee J. Rogers - Presentations

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Presentations

  • Stillman CM, Watt JC, Rogers RJ, Jakicic JM, Erickson KI. Changes in Brain Perfusion Following a 12-Month Weight Loss Intervention are Associated with Changes in Body Mass Index. American College of Sports Medicine, 2017.
  • Rogers RJ, McGuire MR, Jakicic JM. Diet plus Varying Doses of Physical Activity on Weight Loss: The Heart Health Study. American College of Sports Medicine, 2017.
  • Creasy SA, Rogers RJ, Davis KK, Barone Gibbs B, Kershaw EE, Kovacs S, McGuire M, Kowalsky R, O'Dell M, Collins K, Raybuck S, Marcin M, Donahue P, Jakicic JM. Effects of Supervised and Unsupervised Physical Activity Programs for Weight Loss. American College of Sports Medicine, 2017.
  • Sherman SA, Rogers RJ, Davis KK, Minster RL, Creasy SA, Mullarkey NC, O'Dell M, Donahue P, Jakicic JM. Energy expenditure in yoga versus walking. American College of Sports Medicine, 2017.
  • Cohen J, Stillman CM, Watt JC, Rogers RJ, Jakicic JM, Erickson KI. Neurocognitive Improvements Following a 12-Month Diet and Physical Activity Intervention. American College of Sports Medicine, 2017.
  • Sara J. Kovacs, Anita P. Courcoulas, Renee J. Rogers, Kelliann K. Davis, John M. Jakicic. Behavioral Correlates of Physical Activity in Post-Bariatric Surgery Patients. Submitted to ASMBS for presentation at the Annual Meeting (November 2017).
  • Rogers RJ, McGuire MR, Jakicic JM. Barriers and Self-Efficacy to Varying Doses of Physical Activity within a 12-Month Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention: The Heart Health Study. The Obesity Society Annual Meeting, November 2016 - pending acceptance.
  • Rogers RJ, Schelbert EB, Barone Gibbs B, McGuire MR, Creasy SA, Kovacs SJ, McCoy SM, Peluso A, Rupp K, Jakicic JM. 12 Month Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention with Varying Doses of Physical Activity: The Heart Health Study. American College of Sports Medicine, 2016
  • Jakicic JM, Rogers RJ, Kovacs SJ, Byard TD, Collins KA, Creasy SA, Gomberg MA, McCoy SM, Peluso A, Raybuck SD, Rupp K, Wojtanowski A, Foster GD. A Commercial Program is Effective for Weight Loss and Improving Health-related Outcomes in Adults. American College of Sports Medicine, 2016.
  • Kowalsky RJ, Barone Gibbs B, Davis KK, Rogers RJ, Wisniewski L, Jakicic JM. Association of Resting Blood Pressure with Adiposity and Physical Activity in Young Adults. American College of Sports Medicine, 2016.
  • Perdomo SJ, Barone Gibbs B, Davis KK, Rogers RJ, Wisniewski L, Jakicic JM. Associations of Fitness, Physical Activity, and Obesity with Heart Rate Recovery in Young Adults with Overweight and Obesity. American College of Sports Medicine, 2016
  • Kovacs S, Kalarchian MA, Marcus MD, Courcoulas AP, Levine MD, Rogers RJ, Jakicic JM. Change in Physical Activity Prior to Bariatric Surgery does not Predict Post-Surgery Weight Loss. American College of Sports Medicine, 2016.
  • Sherman S, Rogers RJ, Jakicic JM. Feasibility of the Addition of Yoga to a Standard Behavioral Weight Control Program. American College of Sports Medicine, 2016.
  • Rogers RJ, Kovacs SJ, Byard TD, Collins KA, Creasy SA, Gomberg MA, McCoy SM, Peluso A, Raybuck SD, Rupp K, Jakicic JM. Weight loss and Program Satisfaction in Response to the Weight Watchers SmartPoints Plan. Experimental Biology, 2016.
  • Rogers RJ, McGuire M, Schelbert EB, Jakicic JM. Behavioral Interventions with Varying Doses of Physical Activity on Weight Loss: The Heart Health Study. The Obesity Society, 2015.
  • Donofry SD, Watt JC, Rogers RJ, Verstynen T, Jakicic JM, Erickson KI. Impulsivity and brain responses to visual food stimuli in adults with obesity. The Obesity Society, 2015.
  • Jakicic JM, King WC, Davis KK, Barone Gibbs B, Helsel D, Marcus MD, Rickman AD, Rogers RJ, Wahed A, Belle SH. Weight loss, body mass index (BMI), and body composition 24 months after a behavioral intervention including wearable technology in young adults: The IDEA Study. The Obesity Society, 2015.
  • Rogers RJ. Effective Application of Technology to Lifestyle Change for Obesity Treatment. Symposium: Implementing Lifestyle Interventions for Obesity: Moving from Science to Practice. ACSM Annual Meeting. San Diego, CA, May 2015.
  • Moody AM, Jakicic JM, McGuire M, Nagle JA, Rogers RJ, Goss F, Barinas-Mitchell E, Barone Gibbs B. Effects of changes in weight, body composition, fitness, and physical activity on aortic pulse wave velocity in overweight and obese adults. ACSM Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA.
  • Rogers RJ, Jakicic JM. How to use Exercise Tools and Free Apps Similar Results to DPP but Fraction of the Cost! ADA Clinical Conference. Orlando, FL, May 2015.
  • Rogers RJ, McGuire M, Jakicic JM. Early Physical Activity Adoption is Associated with 6 Month Engagement in a Weight Loss Intervention. American College of Sports Medicine, 2015.
  • Byard T, Rogers RJ, Jakicic JM. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN BODY IMAGE AND WEIGHT LOSS IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH OBESITY. The Obesity Society national meeting. Boston, MA. 2014.

    Background: There is variability in the weight loss achieved with behavior interventions. It is important to identify factors that may contribute to this variability and provide intervention targets. This study examined whether perceptions of body image were associated with change in body weight in adults.

    Methods: Participants (n=154; age: 37.5±5.7 years; BMI: 32.7±4.1 kg/m2) engaged in a 6 month behavioral weight loss intervention. This included weekly group sessions, and a prescribed energy restricted diet with increased physical activity. Assessments of weight and body image were completed at baseline and 6 months. Body image was assessed using the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire, with standard orientation (value or investment placed on an item) and evaluation subscales computed.

    Results: Weight loss was 8.6±4.7 kg. Baseline illness orientation (r=0.16, r=0.04) and overweight preoccupation (r=0.17, p=0.04) were associated with weight loss. Weight loss was associated with changes in weight satisfaction (r=0.28, p=0.001), health orientation (r=0.18, p=0.03), fitness orientation (r=0.31, p

    Conclusions: Components of body image are associated with improved weight loss. Emphasizing the value of fitness and physical activity (fitness orientation), which are components that can be modified by interventions, may improve weight loss in patients seeking treatment for overweight and obesity.

  • Peluso A, Rogers RJ, Jakicic JM. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CONSUMPTION AND WEIGHT LOSS IN RESPONSE TO A BEHAVIORAL WEIGHT LOSS INTERVENTION. The Obesity Society national meeting. Boston, MA. 2014.

    Background: Fruit and vegetable consumption has been recommended as part of a healthy diet. This study examined the change in fruit and vegetable consumption within the context of a 12 month behavioral weight loss intervention and whether this was associated with weight loss.

    Methods: Participants were 151 adults classified as overweight or obese (age=38.0±5.5 years; BMI=32.6±4.2 kg/m2) who completed a 12 month behavioral weight loss intervention. Participants received weekly contact that included a combination of group sessions and brief telephone call, and were prescribed a calorie restricted diet and increased physical activity. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Weight was assessed on a calibrated scale. Total daily energy intake (TDEI) and daily servings of fruits and vegetables (FR+VEG) were assessed using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ).

    Results: Weight loss was 9.7±5.3% at 6 months and 9.4±7.8% at 12 months (p

    Conclusions: An intervention focused on energy restriction can also increase fruit and vegetable intake. However, fruit and vegetable consumption is not associated with weight loss. Thus, fruit and vegetable consumption may not be important as a dietary recommendation to improve weight loss.

  • McCoy, Rogers RJ, Jakicic JM. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN PERCEIVED VALUE OF HEALTH, FITNESS, AND APPEARANCE WITH ENGAGEMENT IN BEHAVIORAL WEIGHT LOSS INTERVENTION COMPONENTS. The Obesity Society national meeting. Boston, MA. 2014.

    Background: Engagement with key components of behavioral interventions is associated with improved weight loss. The aim of this analysis is to examine the associations between engagement in weight loss intervention components and perceived value or investment placed on health, fitness, or appearance in adults.

    Methods: Participants (n=154; age: 37.8±5.6 years; BMI: 32.7±4.1 kg/m2) engaged in a 24-week standard behavioral intervention, which included weekly group sessions, an energy restricted diet, and increased physical activity. Assessments were completed at baseline and 24 weeks. Perceived value and investment placed on health and fitness was assessed from the orientation subscales (health, fitness, appearance) from the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire. Engagement in intervention components (attendance at weekly meetings, self-monitoring diaries [SMD] returned, physical activity [PA]) were assessed. PA (kcal/week) was assessed with the Paffenbarger Questionnaire.

    Results: Weight loss was 8.6±4.7 kg. Baseline health, but not fitness orientation, was associated with change in PA (r=.19, p=.02). Baseline health or fitness orientation were not associated with attendance at sessions or SMD returned. Change in fitness orientation was associated with change in PA (r=.20), with change in health orientation associated with SMD return (r=.19) (p=.02). Neither baseline nor change in appearance orientation was associated with engagement in the intervention components.

    Conclusions: Emphasizing the value of health prior to weight loss intervention and the value of fitness across the intervention may be associated with improved participation in PA. However, the value of appearance should be de-emphasized as this does not appear to be associated with intervention engagement.

  • Rogers RJ, McGuire M, Nagle JA, McCoy SM, Peluso A, Rupp K, Barone Gibbs B, Jakicic JM. ASSOCIATION OF LIFESTYLE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY COMPONENTS AND SEDENTARY BEHAVIOR WITH WEIGHT LOSS. The Obesity Society national meeting. Boston, MA. 2014.

    Background: Physical activity is an important intervention target for weight loss. Little is known about lifestyle components of physical activity and their association with weight change. This study examined the association of work, household, recreational, travel, and sedentary behavior with weight loss.

    Methods: Participants were enrolled in a 12 month behavioral weight loss intervention, with assessments at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Data were available for N=205 at 6 months (age=45.5±7.1 years, BMI=32.2±3.8 kg/m2) and N=121 at 12 months (age=46.2±6.3 years, BMI=32.0±3.6 kg/m2). The intervention included a combination of weekly group sessions and telephone calls, a prescribed energy restricted diet and/or prescribed moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Weight was assessed on a digital scale. Physical activity was assessed with the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire and included measures of work MVPA, household MVPA, recreational MVPA, travel MVPA, total MVPA, and sedentary time.

    Results: Weight was decreased by 9.0±6.3 kg and 9.9±7.9 kg at 6 and 12 months, respectively (p

    Conclusions: Components of MVPA, in particular travel MVPA, is associated with change in weight at 6 and 12 months. However, sedentary behavior is not associated with weight change. Interventions should consider targeting active commuting as a strategy to increase physical activity and improve weight loss.

  • Jakicic JM, Davis KK, King WC, Rickman AD, Rogers RJ. EFFECT OF A BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTION ON WEIGHT LOSS, BODY COMPOSITION, FITNESS, AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN YOUNG ADULTS. The Obesity Society national meeting. Boston, MA. 2014.

    Background: Overweight and obesity in young adulthood (age=18 to 35 years) has been increasing. Few studies have specifically examined the effect of a standard behavioral intervention on change in weight, body composition, fitness, and physical activity in this age group, which is the aim of this study.

    Methods: Participants (N=470; median age: 30.6[IQR: 27.0, 33.5] years; median BMI: 30.9[IQR: 28.1, 34.1]) were enrolled in a 6 month behavioral weight loss intervention. The intervention included weekly group sessions, a prescribed energy restricted diet and prescribed moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Assessments included weight, body composition by DXA, fitness by exercise test, and objective physical activity using a monitor. The monitor provided data on minutes of total MVPA (>3 METs), MVPA performed in bouts >10 minutes, total light physical activity (LPA, 1.5 to

    Results: There were changes in %weight loss (-8.8%[-3.8,-13.4]), %body fat (-3.7%[-1.6,-6.4]), and fitness (3.5ml/kg/min[0.8,6.2])(p >10 minutes from 100[26,192] to 215[99,389]min/wk (p >150 min/wk of MVPA performed in >10 minute bouts increased from 34.2% at baseline to 66.3% at 6 months (p

    Conclusions: A behavioral intervention can be effective at eliciting significant 6 month changes in weight, body composition, fitness, and physical activity in young adults. However, additional efforts are needed to further increase physical activity participation, which may be the focus of future interventions.

  • Creasy S, Rogers RJ, Jakicic JM. WEIGHT LOSS IS ASSOCIATED WITH DOSE AND TYPES OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. The Obesity Society national meeting. Boston, MA. 2014.

    Background: Physical activity is important for weight loss and other health outcomes. This analysis examined the relationship of total physical activity (TPA), sport, fitness, recreational activity (SFR), and walking with weight loss and fitness during a 12 month weight loss intervention.

    Methods: Participants were 83 adults (age=37.5±6.1 yrs; BMI: 32.5±4.4 kg/m2) who completed a 12 month behavioral weight loss intervention. Participants received weekly contact that included a combination of group sessions and brief telephone calls, and were prescribed a calorie restricted diet and increased physical activity. Assessments were conducted at 0 and 12 months. Physical activity was measured using the Paffenbarger Questionnaire, which estimated energy expenditure for TPA, walking, and SFR. Fitness was assessed with a submax graded exercise test. Subjects were grouped based on weight loss at 12 months as >10% (WL>10%, N=40).

    Results: Weight loss was different between WL10% (16.8±5.2 kg), WL5% (8.1±1.3 kg), WL

    Conclusions: TPA is associated with 12 month weight loss and improved fitness. Walking is also associated with weight loss but not fitness, with SFR not significantly contributing to weight loss or change in fitness. Thus, interventions should focus on total physical activity and walking to enhance weight loss.

  • Association of technology intervention components with weight loss in severely obese adults

    May 2014


    Rogers RJ, Barone Gibbs B, Davis KK, Jakicic JM. Association of technology intervention components with weight loss in severely obese adults. ACSM Annual meeting, Orlando, FL. 2014.



    Technology-based interventions that rely on minimal contact with an interventionist have been shown to be effective for weight loss in obese adults. These technology systems that are used have evolved to include wearable monitors and web interfaces that provide feedback to patients on goal achievement for weight loss and key lifestyle factors that include diet and physical activity.



    PURPOSE: To examine the association between weight loss and patient engagement with technology components that includes an activity monitor and a web interface to self-report dietary intake and self-weighing.



    METHODS: 25 Class II and III obese adults (age: 40.0±9.4 years, BMI: 39.5±3.0 kg/m2) participated in a technology-based weight loss intervention. Diet was prescribed at 1500 – 2100 kcal/day and physical activity was prescribed to progress to 200 min/wk. The technology intervention included a wearable device to provide feedback on physical activity and energy expenditure, and a web interface to self-report weight and dietary intake. Weight was also measured objectively by the investigators at 0 and 12 weeks.



    RESULTS: 21 of the 25 subjects (84%) provided an objective measure of weight at both 0 and 12 weeks. These subjects significantly changed their body weight from baseline (110.8±12.4 kg) to 12 weeks (105.8±13.6 kg) (p 2=.312, p=.008); however, days of self-reported dietary intake and days of reported self-weighing were not significant predicators of weight change.



    CONCLUSIONS: Within a technology-based intervention, encouraging the use of a monitor for physical activity and energy expenditure and self-report of weight appear to be associated with improved short-term weight loss in Class II and III obese adults. However, encouraging regular use of a monitor for physical activity and energy expenditure may be of particular importance for improving weight loss. These findings warrant replication in longer-term interventions of severely obese adults.

  • Objective vs. self-reported sedentary behavior and cardiovascular risk factors in overweight and obese young adults.

    May 2014

    Barone Gibbs B, King WC, Davis KK, Rickman AD, Rogers RJ, Jakicic JM. Objective vs. self-reported sedentary behavior and cardiovascular risk factors in overweight and obese young adults. ACSM Annual meeting, Orlando, FL. 2014

  • Self-reported vs. objective sedentary behavior assessment in young adults.

    Mar 2014

    Barone Gibbs B, King WC, Davis KK, Rickman, RD, Rogers RJ, Belle SH, Jakicic JM. Self-reported vs. objective sedentary behavior assessment in young adults. American Heart Association Epidemiology and Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism meeting. San Francisco, CA 2014.

  • Influence of fitness and BMI on cardiac structure and function in overweight and obese adults.

    Nov 2013

    Jakicic JM, Rogers RJ, Schelbert EB. Influence of fitness and BMI on cardiac structure and function in overweight and obese adults. The Obesity Society Annual meeting, Atlanta, GA, 2013.

  • Physical activity among overweight and obese young adults: association with fitness and BMI

    Nov 2013

    Physical activity among overweight and obese young adults: association with fitness and BMI. Co-author. The Obesity Society Annual meeting, Atlanta, GA, 2013.

  • The comparison of a technology-based system and in-person behavioral weight loss intervention in the severely obese

    Nov 2013

    Rogers RJ, Davis KK, Barone Gibbs B, Jakicic JM. The comparison of a technology-based system and in-person behavioral weight loss intervention in the severely obese. The Obesity Society Annual meeting. Atlanta, GA, 2013.

    Technology-based systems incorporating a physical activity monitor and web interface to monitor dietary intake and weight combined with monthly telephone contact has been shown to be an effective intervention for weight loss. Whether this type of intervention is effective for individuals with Class II (BMI = 35.0 to 2) or III (BMI >40 kg/m2) obesity has not been examined. Moreover, continuous enhancements in technology require ongoing evaluation of the effectiveness of these interventions. METHODS: 39 adults (age: 39.9±9.7, BMI: 39.5±2.8 kg/m2) were randomized to BWLI (N=14), TECH (N=12), or EN-TECH (N=13). Subjects decreased energy intake (1500-2100 kcal/d), and increased physical activity (200 min/wk). BWLI attended weekly group sessions. TECH was provided with a wearable activity monitor that interfaced with a web-based program, and received one 10-minute telephone call per month. EN-TECH received the same components as TECH, with enhanced Bluetooth capability for real-time monitoring of energy balance. RESULTS: Weight was significantly reduced from 110.9±9.1 to 105.9±9.1 kg in BWLI (-5.0±6.2 kg, p CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that short-term weight loss can be achieved in individuals with Class II or III obesity with less in-person contact using a technology-based system with periodic telephone contact. Findings may have clinical implications for delivery of weight loss interventions for severely obese adults. Long-term effectiveness of a technology-based intervention warrants further investigation.

  • Effect of sedentary time on physical fitness in overweight and obese adults (Poster) American College of Sports Medicine Annual Conference, Indianapolis, IN

    May 2013 - Jun 2013


    Effect of Sedentary Time on Physical Fitness in Overweight and Obese Adults



    Anne M. Moody, Bethany Barone Gibbs, Meghan R. McGuire, Jacquelyn A. Nagle, Renee J. Rogers, John M. Jakicic (FACSM)



    University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA



    Cardiorespiratory fitness predicts future cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, while sedentary (SED) time is associated with cardiovascular health outcomes, independent of moderate/vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Whether SED time relates to fitness independently from MVPA merits further investigation. PURPOSE: To determine if SED time predicts duration of a sub-maximal graded exercise test (GXT) independent of MVPA in overweight and obese adults. METHODS: Inactive overweight and obese adults (N=106, age 46 ± 6 yrs, BMI 32 ± 3 kg/m², ≤30 min x 3 times/week aerobic exercise) completed baseline testing for an ongoing randomized trial. Fitness was assessed by GXT to 85% age-predicted maximal heart rate. MVPA and weekday, weekend, and overall SED time were self-reported by the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire and a sedentary behavior questionnaire adapted from the CARDIA study. Pearson’s correlations between SED time and GXT duration were calculated; significant associations were adjusted for MVPA. RESULTS: SED time was greater on weekdays vs. weekends (p CONCLUSIONS: SED time was greater on weekdays, but only weekend time was related to fitness with and without adjustment for MVPA. These data suggest that interventions could target decreasing weekend SED time, along with increasing physical activity, to improve fitness.



    Supported by NIH (HL103646)



    Sedentary Time and Physical Activity in Relation to Graded Exercise Test Duration





































     




    Mean ± SD (hrs)




    Unadjusted Pearson’s r with GXT duration




    Partial Pearson’s r* with GXT duration




    Weekday Sedentary Time (hrs/day)




    16.5 ± 6.5




    -0.097 (p = 0.323)




     




    Weekend Sedentary Time (hrs/day)




    9.0 ± 4.3




    -0.195 (p = 0.045)




    -0.201 (p = 0.041)




    Overall Sedentary Time (hrs/day)




    14.4 ± 5.4




    -0.128 (p = 0.191)




     




    Physical Activity (MET-hrs)




    10.8 ± 19.7




    0.191 (p = 0.051)




    0.227 (p = 0.021)




    *Partial r with graded exercise test including weekend sedentary time and moderate/vigorous physical activity as independent variables


  • Racial differences in sedentary behavior in overweight and obese adults (Poster) American College of Sports Medicine Annual Conference, Indianapolis, IN

    May 2013 - Jun 2013


    RACIAL DIFFERENCES IN SEDENTARY BEHAVIOR IN OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE ADULTS



    Kelli Davis, Bethany Barone Gibbs, Renee Rogers, Anne Moody, Jackie Nagle, Meghan McGuire, and John M. Jakicic, FACSM. Physical Activity and Weight Management Research Center, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA



    BACKGROUND: Sedentary behavior has been identified as a major risk factor for chronic disease. Given the relatively higher rates of obesity and related comorbidities in African-Americans (AA), measuring sedentary behaviors and the contextual determinants between races may provide insight and specific targets for intervention. PURPOSE: To examine racial differences in sedentary behavior and fitness in AA and White (W) adults. METHODS Baseline measures of sedentary behavior and fitness in AA (n=28) and W (n=75) subjects (n=103; 45.9±6.4yrs; BMI=31.9±3.4) enrolled in a 12-month behavioral weight loss intervention were examined. Sedentary behavior (SED) (hours/day) was assessed by questionnaire. Questions regarding sitting time while at work, during recreation time, during transportation, and on weekdays/weekends were examined. Fitness (min) was measured during a submaximal treadmill test to 85% age-predicted maximal heart rate, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was assessed by the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire. RESULTS: Total SED was significantly greater in AA (16.6±5.6hr/d) compared with W (13.5±5.2hr/d)(p CONCLUSIONS: Prior to a weight loss intervention, AA have nearly 3-4 more hours of total sedentary time per day when compared to W, a difference that appears to be due to variations in sedentary time during recreation rather than during work or transportation. In addition, although reported MVPA was similar between the groups, fitness was higher in the W adults. These findings emphasize the potentially essential role of interventions that aim to replace sedentary time with light physical activity during free-time to improve fitness and possibly overall health in AA.



     



    Supported by NIH (HL103646)


  • The comparison of a technology-based system and in-person weight loss intervention in the severely obese. (thematic poster) American College of Sports Medicine Annual Conference, Indianapolis, IN

    May 2013 - Jun 2013


    THE COMPARISON OF A TECHNOLOGY-BASED SYSTEM AND IN-PERSON BEHAVIORAL WEIGHT LOSS INTERVENTION IN THE SEVERELY OBESE



    Renee J. Rogers, Kelliann K. Davis, Bethany Barone Gibbs, Lora A. Burke, John M. Jakicic. University of Pittsburgh



    A technology-based system incorporating a physical activity monitor and a web interface to monitor dietary intake and body weight combined with monthly telephone contact has been shown to be an effective intervention for weight loss. Whether this type of intervention is effective for individuals with Class II (BMI = 35.0 to 2) or III (BMI >40 kg/m2) obesity has not been examined. Moreover, continuous enhancements in technology require ongoing evaluation of the effectiveness of these interventions. PURPOSE: To examine weight loss in response to an in-person behavioral weight loss (BWLI), technology-based (TECH), and an enhanced technology (EN-TECH) interventions in adults with Class II or III obesity. METHODS: Subjects were 18 adults (age: 41.7±8.0, BMI: 39.3±2.5 kg/m2) randomized to BWLI (N=7), TECH (N=6), or EN-TECH (N=5). The prescription for all subjects included decreases in energy intake to 1500-2100 kcal/d, and increases in physical activity to 200 min/wk. BWLI attended weekly in-person group intervention sessions. TECH was provided with a wearable activity monitor that was interfaced with a web-based program to monitor dietary intake (BodyMedia FIT), while also receiving one 10-minute intervention telephone call per month. EN-TECH received the same component as TECH, with the technology enhanced with Bluetooth capability to allow for real-time monitoring of energy balance (intake and expenditure)(BodyMedia LINK). RESULTS: Body weight was significantly reduced from 115.6±8.6 to 111.8±8.8 kg in BWLI (-3.8±3.6 kg, p=.030), 107.2±6.2 to 100.3±6.2 in TECH (-6.9±3.1 kg, p=.003), and 102.7±14.4 to 96.1±16.0 in EN-TECH (-6.5±4.7 kg, p=.036) from 0 to 3 months. However, weight loss was not significantly different between the intervention groups. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that significant short-term weight loss can be achieved in individuals with Class II or III obesity with less in-person contact using a technology-based system combined with periodic telephone contact. These findings may have significant clinical implications for effective delivery of weight loss interventions for severely obese adults. Whether these findings extend beyond the initial 3 months of intervention and the long-term acceptability of a technology-based intervention warrants further investigation.


  • Influence of Objectively Measured Physical Activity on Change in Fitness in a Weight Loss Intervention (Poster) American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA

    May 2012


    INFLUENCE OF OBJECTIVELY MEASURED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ON CHANGE IN FITNESS IN A WEIGHT LOSS INTERVENTION



    Renee J. Rogers1, Kelli K. Davis1, Deborah F. Tate2, Kristen Polzien2, John M. Jakicic. University of Pittsburgh1 and University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill2.



    Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) accumulating to at least 1,000 kcal/wk or 150 min/wk is recommended to improve fitness in adults, and activity should be accumulated in bouts of at least 10 minutes. However, little is known about the contribution of shorter duration MVPA or lower intensity activity on change in fitness. PURPOSE: To examine the pattern and intensity of objectively measured physical activity on change in fitness in obese adults across a behavioral weight loss intervention (BWLI). METHODS: Subjects were 216 adults (age: 42.8±9.2, BMI: 32.6±3.6 kg/m2) participating in an 18-month BWLI. BWLI includes prescription to decrease energy intake to 1200-1500 kcal/d, and increase PA to 300 min/wk. PA and fitness were assessed at 0, 6, and 18 months. PA was assessed objectively using an armband that provided minute-by-minute data for a period of 7 days (SenseWear Pro ArmbandTM, BodyMedia, Inc). Fitness was assessed using a graded exercise test, with fitness defined as time to achieve 85% of age-predicted maximal heart rate (85%HRmax). MVPA was defined as bouts that were >10 minutes in duration and >3.0 METS. MVPA was also defined as total minutes >3.0 METS regardless of length of bout (MVPA-MIN). LPA was defined as minutes of activity between 1.5 to 2.9 METS. RESULTS: Change in time to achieve 85%HRMAX from 0 to 6 months was correlated with MVPA-MIN (r=.29, p p p=.001) of change in time to 85%HRmax, whereas neither MVPA-MIN nor LPA were not. At 18 months, change in time to 85%HRmax was correlated with LPA (r=.203, p=.003), MVPA-MIN (r=.374, p p p p=.009) were significant predictors of changes in time to 85%HRmax. CONCLUSIONS: During the initial 6 months of BWLI, total MVPA performed in bouts of at least 10 min in duration are associated with improvement in fitness. However, both MVPA and LPA contribute to improvement in fitness observed at 18 months. These findings suggest that need for BWLI to include strategies to improve participation in both MVPA and LPA for overweight and obese adults.



    Supported by the National Institutes of Health (HL008840)



     


  • Differences in measured versus estimated oxygen consumption in represent metabolic equivalents (METS) in overweight and obese adults (Poster) The Obesity Society Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL

    Oct 2011

    DIFFERENCES IN MEASURED VERSUS ESTIMATED OXYGEN CONSUMPTION TO REPRESENT

    METABOLIC EQUIVALENTS (METS) IN OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE ADULTS

    Renee J. Rogers, John M. JakicicBackground: Energy expenditure is commonly expressed in multiples of the metabolic equivalent (MET), with 1 MET estimated to be equivalent to 3.5 ml/kg/min or 0.250 L/min of oxygen consumption (VO2).

    Methods: This investigation examined whether the estimated VO2 used to express a MET was significantly different than measured VO2 in overweight, obese class I, and obese class II subjects. Forty-four (age: 37.5±10.4, BMI: 32.6±3.4) overweight, Class I, or Class II obese subjects participated in this study. Resting energy expenditure (REE) was assessed on two separate days. Following a 30 minute supine resting period in a semi-darkened room, REE was assessed using the dilution technique. Data were expressed as relative (ml/kg/min) and absolute (L/min) VO2.

    Results: Relative VO2 (3.0±0.6 ml/kg/min, p

    Conclusions: These differences between the measured and estimated VO2 representing 1 MET in overweight and obese adults may have implications with regard to energy expenditure and its assumed impact on body weight regulation. Continued efforts are needed to understand factors that influence metabolism and the variability observed between individuals in energy expenditure.

  • Acute affective responses to varying durations of physical activity among overweight and obese women. (Presentation) Society of Behavioral Medicine Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA

    Apr 2011

    Michael JC, Marcus MD, Davis KK, Rogers RJ, Taylor M, Coppock J, McGuire M, Unick JL, Jakicic JM. Acute affective responses to varying durations of physical activity among overweight and obese women. Society for Behavioral Medicine. April 2011.

  • Effects of Aerobic Dance in children with autism

    2004

    Rogers RJ, Pintar JA. Effects of Aerobic Dance in children with autism. Academic Alliance Regional Research Symposium. Youngstown, OH. 2004

  • Effects of Aerobic Dance in Children with Autism

    2004

    Rogers RJ, Pintar JA. Effects of Aerobic Dance in children with autism. Quest. Youngstown, OH. 2004

  • Effects of Aerobic Dance in Children with Autism

    2003

    Rogers RJ, Pintar JA. Effects of Aerobic Dance in children with autism. Mid-West ACSM. Toledo, OH. 2003.